2015 Jorde Symposium Capsule Summary

2015 Jorde Symposium Capsule Summary

In response to Justice Stephen Breyer’s 2015 Brennan Center Jorde Symposium Lecture, 104 Calif. L. Rev. 1553 (2016).

On September 24, 2015, Justice Stephen Breyer delivered the annual Jorde Symposium lecture at the First Congregational Church in Berkeley, California. In his lecture, “The Court and the World: The Supreme Court’s New Transnational Role,” Justice Breyer spoke about the many reasons why American judges must take ever-greater account of foreign events, law, and practices. An edited transcript of his Jorde Symposium remarks immediately precedes this summary. His remarks served to introduce and explain his recent book, The Court and the World: American Law and the New Global Realities.

Here, we provide a summary of the contents of Justice Breyer’s book followed by two thoughtful pieces written in response to Justice Breyer’s lecture, by Professors Curtis Bradley and Jenny Martinez.

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